DEEP RIVER, Conn. (WTNH) – New Haven-based pastor Boise Kimber has been an outspoken advocate of racial issues in the Elm City.

On Wednesday, he and other clergy members went to Deep River to show support for a family there and call on the state to take action.

“These are little things that are creeping up right now,” said Pastor John Lewis of the Christ Chapel New Testament Church.

The clergy went to Deep River to call for a local man to face a hate crime charge.

They’re referring to an incident that started on Main Street last week when 48-year-old Jameson Chapman was reportedly bumped by some boys on bicycles. One video shows them arguing while a second one then shows Chapman allegedly pushing an eleven-year-old who is bi-racial off of his bike.

“He’s traumatized. He’s avoiding places and people,” said Desiree Dominique, the boy’s mother.

“I don’t think it’s a tough charge to prove because there were little white kids with him so what’s the tough… why didn’t he go push them over,” said Rev. Boise Kimber, President of the CT State Missionary Baptist Convention.

The state’s attorney’s office told News8 it could not comment on an ongoing case.

“They will be investigating it,” said Rev. Kimber. “That’s what we’re pushing for.”

Deep River First Selectman Angus McDonald who wasn’t invited to the press conference in front of town hall told News8 he’s hoping to organize a forum and workshops and start a conversation that the clergy says should include voices of color.

“We’re looking for as many voices as we can,” said McDonald.

That after this incident and a racially motivated message which was placed on the town message board a few months ago.

“These are horrible, horrible incidents,” said McDonald.

The first selectman tells News 8 that what has happened recently doesn’t reflect the entire town. In fact, he says the ‘Hands Together’ campaign started at The Nest Coffee House is more indicative of this community.

“My experience in Deep River has been absolutely welcoming and wonderful,” said coffee shop employee Kim Taylor who is African American.

Anyone who donates can fill one of the cut-out paper hands of many different skin tones which will be hung on the front door for The Nest’s diversity collage.

“We’ll do the same thing if it was you too. No black people treat white people a certain way. We don’t want white people treating black people… Let’s just treat each other fair like human beings,” said Pastor Rodney Williams.

A chorus of new voices is now being heard in the quiet little town.

Another video shows Chapman pushing the boy’s bike over, causing him to fall off of it.

Chapman was charged with breach of peace, risk of injury to a child, and third-degree assault charges.

The clergy is saying they want a hate crime added to the list of charges.

“I don’t think it’s a tough charge to prove because there were little white kids with him, so why didn’t he go push them over,” said Rev. Boise Kimber, President of CT State Missionary Baptist Convention.

“We want to have a conversation to begin a continuous dialogue about how to be more inclusive,” said Angus McDonald Jr., First Selectman of Deep River.

The first selectman told News 8 that what happened doesn’t reflect the entire town. He says the Hands Together campaign started at the Nest Coffee House is more indicative of the community.