Conn. (WTNH) – Affected customers are getting ready for some sticker shock at the start of the new year. 

Eversource and United Illuminating (UI) filed new supply rates with the state’s Public Utilities Regulatory Authority (PURA), citing ongoing global demand. 

On average, an Eversource residential electric customer who uses 700 kilowatt hours of power each month could see an increase of approximately 48% or $84.85 over their current monthly bill on the supply portion of the bill, the company announced Thursday.

Unless PURA finds a problem with the plan, Eversource’s proposed Standard Service Rate for its residential customers would change from 12.1 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to 24.2 cents per kWh, compared to 11.5 cents per kWh last winter. 

UI said the Standard Service Rate for its residential customers will rise from 10.62 to 21.94 cents per kWh. On average, UI customers could see an increase of approximately 43% or $79.24 over their current monthly bill on the supply portion of the bill, the company said.

Veronica Lowery is a customer with United Illuminating in Hamden. She says she will have to spend about 80 dollars more when the new rate kicks in. 

“That 80 dollars could go towards my car note. Or my cable bill. Everything’s high,” said Lowrey. “Everything is going up. No consideration of anything, they just go up on our bills and all we can do is pay it or be without lights.” 

Rick Liso is an Eversource customer and lives in Branford. He was shocked to hear how much the company was going to charge customers. 

“50% is just a bit exorbitant, just a little high. Just bordering on stupid,” he told News 8. “It’s more annoying than anything else. More of an annoyance. Financially we’re fine, we can do it, it’s not a big deal but I don’t really see where that kind of rate increase is necessary,” said Liso.

For small businesses, the new supply rate makes a huge impact. Tony Cuomo owns the 1928 Cocktail Club on Main Street in Branford. The bar has been open for seven months and he’s already faced several challenges. 

“Our margins are getting thinner and thinner because the spirits are going up in price and then with the distribution being as poor as it is, some spirits we can’t even get,” said Cuomo. “This is one more item that makes it harder for us to survive in our business and keep people employed.”