Malloy says Sanders’ Clinton endorsement helpful

Politics

HARTFORD, Conn. (WTNH) — After more than a year of verbally beating each other up, and 35 days after Hillary Clinton clinched the nomination, Bernie Sanders‘ endorsement Tuesday in New Hampshire is the final move in the attempt to solidify the Democratic Party for the final election.

“I think Hillary Clinton and Sen. Sanders have done a lot to unify the party. I also think that Donald Trump has helped to unify the Democratic Party as well,” said Gov. Dannel Malloy.

Sanders who attracted thousands of mostly younger voters to rallies in New Haven and Hartford in April, received nearly 47 percent of the votes in the Connecticut Presidential primary. His campaign had unsuccessfully sought to have Gov. Malloy removed from the party Platform Committee co-chairmanship because of Malloy’s criticism of Sanders’ past support of a bill granting immunity from liability for gun manufacturers.

Malloy noting that a recent poll showed that 85 percent of Sanders supporters had already said they’d vote for Clinton. “I think that this is helpful, listen, I want to see a democratic president, I think having a unified party will make that easier to do so,” the Governor said.

One of the issues that attracted younger voters to Sanders was his proposal for free college tuition. Clinton herself made Malloy’s job on the platform committee more accommodating to Sanders supporters by including a plank that calls for free tuition at state schools for those under certain income limits.

“I think having the federal government play a larger role is not necessarily a bad thing. I would start by cutting the interest rate on student loans,” Malloy added.

The Governor says that what the party platform acknowledges is that college tuition has gone up faster than most other costs to families and that government back student loan rates are much higher than is necessary.

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